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Lacebugs

Elimination, Biology, Description of Lace Bugs

Products used in Lacebug (Lace bug) control

Description and Damage
Lacebugs are small (1/8 inch) insects of the family Tingidae, which means "ornamented."  The adults have delicate clear wings that they hold flat over their bodies.  The wings have many, giving them a lacy appearance.   Immature lacebugs are dark and wingless, with spines radiating from the edges of their bodies.
Lacebugs are pests primarily of ornamental trees and shrubs, although several species infest a few vegetables.  Most lacebugs feed on only one type of plant.  They damage plants by sucking the sap and cell contents from the undersides of the leaves, producing a mottling or speckling on the upper surfaces.  Lacebug damage often resembles leafhopper or spider mite damage.  However, lacebugs excrete drops of shiny, varnish-like excrement, which accumulates around them as they feed.  Several generations of lacebugs occur each year.  Certain lacebugs may build up to such tremendous numbers on their host plant that very little green tissue remains to produce food for the plant.

Lacebug Control

Lacebugs should be controlled early, before they cause much damage.   This is especially important on broad-leaved evergreen plants because they retain the unproductive leaves for several years.
To kill lacebugs on evergreens and other non-food plants and ornamentals, use Acephate Pro 75.  This is a water-soluble powder concentrate that can be applied using a hose-end sprayer (Dial-A-Mix) or pump type (Chapin) garden sprayer.  Acephate Pro 75 is a systemic insecticide; do not irrigate treated area for at least 48 hours after application of the insecticide.   For best results, spray for lacebugs in late evening or early morning.  Repeat application in about 10 days, if necessary.  Keep people and pets off all treated areas until dry.  Another product used by professionals (to control turf and ornamental pests, borers of trees, etc.) is Permethrin.

 

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LACE BUGS   lacebugs